During a question-and-answer session in the Spanish parliament yesterday, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez found little support from other parties


During a question-and-answer session in the Spanish parliament yesterday, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez found little support from other parties, which has increased doubts as to whether MPs will support the government’s request for another extension to the state of alarm, which must be renewed every two weeks.

Last week, he managed to secure approval for a third extension with votes against from far-right Vox, Together for Cataloniathe CUP and the abstention of the Catalan Republican Left (ERC).

Sánchez heads up a coalition government, made up of his Socialist PSOE Party and junior partner, left-wing Unidas Podemos.

The government lacks a working majority and as such must rely on the support of other parties in order to pass legislation.

The leader of the main opposition Popular Party (PP), Pablo Casado, repeatedly accused Sánchez of lying during the coronavirus crisis, and warned that his party may abstain at the upcoming vote.

Center-right Ciudadanos (Citizens), meanwhile, also criticised the government raising questions about its support.

Gabriel Rufián, from ERC, said that his party was considering voting against the coalition.

The Basque Nationalist Party (PNV) have said that if it’s regional govermnent don’t agree with the next steps then it would withdraw its support.

The common critisism related to the lack of dialogue by government with opposition parties before making major announcements, such as the deescalation plan Sánchez unveiled on Tuesday.

During the session MPs voiced their criticism of the plan, not so much the content, but rather the lack of detail.

High-ranking MPs from PP and Vox also warned the government that they would be filing lawsuits over what they alledged were “criminal” offences related to the government’s management of the coronavirus crisis, which has claimed 24,275 lives here in Spain.

La Liga is working towards its clubs returning to training as soon as possible after being given the green light by the Spanish government.

The aim is a potential restart to the league in mid-June behind closed doors.