Several of Spain’s regional premiers have told Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez that they oppose another extension


Several of Spain’s regional premiers have told Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez that they oppose another extension of the state of alarm which gives central government extra powers to deal with the coronavirus crisis.

The state of alarm must be approved by parliament every two weeks, and the current period is set to end this Saturday May 9.

Sánchez, who heads a minority coalition government with junior partner Unidas Podemos, will need the support of other partys, such as the main opposition Popular Party (PP), if he is to secure the required votes in Spain’s lower house of parliament on Wednesday for a further two weeks of the state of alarm.

The PP and far-right Vox, among other partys, have made it clear in recent weeks that they may not support another extension.
MW – Spain revelled in a second day of freedom yesterday, flocking outdoors in time-slots for age groups on the first weekend adults were allowed out since one of the world’s strictest coronavirus lockdowns was imposed in mid-March.

Though Spain’s appalling COVID-19 outbreak has shrouded the nation in mourning for more than 25,000 dead, there was much-needed relief on a sunny spring day as people at last headed back out.

Joggers and cyclists hit the streets early on, before it was the elderly and then children’s turn – all under orders to stay 2 metres apart under continued social distancing guidelines.
One of the worst-hit nations, Spain’s death toll climbed by 164 yesterday to 25,264, while cases reached 217,466.

But the declining pace of deaths and infections has led Spain to start unwinding its stay-at-home order.
To prevent overcrowding, Barcelona’s city council barred entry to its urban beaches, so thousands converged instead on the beachfront.

In the capital Madrid, where parks and other large public spaces remain closed, runners and walkers shared narrow pavements and walkways.

The relaxation of exercise restrictions is one of the first steps in a four-phase plan to reopen Spain by the end of June.